How to check the number of shutter actuations (shots) of a Nikon DSLR camera

Here’s a simple way to check the number of shutter releases (the real number of shots taken with a camera) for Nikon DSLR cameras (on other cameras or brands, I’m sure it’s really similar).

1. Take a photo with your camera or find the last photo stored in your computer (card, disk, whatever). The important thing to keep in mind is that it must be a photo taken with the camera without any external processing (NEF or RAW files, or untouched JPG’s). This information is stored in the EXIF data stored with the photo and it’s really easy to erase that information just by opening a JPG in Photoshop and saving it again.

2. Open the photo with Photoshop (I’ve used CS6, but it works in CS5, CS4, CS3 and probably CS2 will be alright too). If it’s a RAW file (NEF, RW2, DNG, etc), probably you’ll get the Camera RAW window first, so just hit Open Image on the bottom of the window to open it in Photoshop.

3. Go to File > File Info and you’ll have access to the photo’s metadata or EXIF information. The information is divided in tabs, so scroll to the ADVANCED tab and open the tree folder “Schema (http://ns.adobe.com/exif/1.0/aux/). The number of shots is stored in the aux:ImageNumber property.

Number of shots of a Nikon Camera
Number of shots of a Nikon Camera

Drop Firefox and Firebug and try the Webkit’s Web Inspector

Firefox and the Firebug extension have been my companion tools for web development for quite a time now. I’ve no serious complains about them, they really helped me a lot. But an alternative is just around the corner and I’m really enjoying it. I really like Safari, but the lack of a proper web development helper life Firebug have kept me away from using it more often. But recently the Web Inspector of Webkit (the engine behind Safari) has really been improved and it’s starting to kick Firebug’s ass.

Don’t take my word for it. Just try it yourself. Here’s how:

1. Download  a nightly build of Webkit and install it on your machine (don’t worry, it won’t replace your Safari app, it’s a separate app).

2. Launch Terminal and type this on your command line: defaults write com.apple.Safari WebKitDeveloperExtras -bool true

Update: Thanks to Maciej Stachowiak for pointing out the easier way to access the Web Inspector: Just open the Webkit preference menu, go to the Advanced tab and check the “Show Develop menu in menu bar”.

Turn on the Develop Menu in Webkit
Turn on the Develop Menu in Webkit

3. Open Webkit and load a webpage.

4. Right Click anywhere and choose Inspect Element and voilá…

Web Inspector
Web Inspector